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Sayre was the surname of a pure-blood wizarding family. Isolt Sayre was one such member who went on to be one of the founders of Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

William Sayre and his wife Rionach Sayre were the parents of Isolt Sayre. They resided at Ilvermorny Cottage in Ireland. They died in a house fire in the early 17th century. Their daughter was saved and she later moved to the New World where she founded the school.[1]

Known members

Family tree

 
Sayre
family
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Slytherin
family
 
Peverell
family
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Morrigan
 
 
 
House of
Gaunt
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Boot
family
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Sayre
(d. 1608)
 
Rionach Gaunt
(d. 1608)
 
Gormlaith Gaunt
(d. c. 1634)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr Boot
 
Mrs Boot
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Martha Steward
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chadwick Boot
(b. 1618)
 
Josefina Calderon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Isolt Sayre
(b. 1603)
 
James Steward
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Calderon-Boot
family
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(adoptive
children
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Webster Boot
(b. 1620)
 
Scottish
witch
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Martha Steward
(b. c. 1634)
 
Pocomtuc
No-Maj
 
Rionach Steward
(b. c. 1634)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(several
generations
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Terry Boot
(b. 1980)
 


Etymology

Sayre is a variant spelling of the English surname Sayer.[2] This surname has multiple possible origins.[2][3] The foremost possibility is that it derives from the Middle English given name Saher/Seir, itself a short form of the Germanic given name Sigiheri, meaning "victory army," from sigi, "victory", and heri, "army."[2][3]

There are several occupational names from which it may derive. It may come from the same root as Sawyer, an occupational name for a woodcutter, which itself comes from the Middle English word saghier.[2] The second possibility is an occupational name for a professional reciter (i.e. someone who recited poetry and prose for a living), derived from the Middle English sey(en), "to say."[2][3] The third such possible origin is an occupational name for a person examined metals or tasted food, from the Middle English world assayer, "tester," from assay, "test, trial," from Old French essay.[2][3] The fourth possibility is a Middle English name for a person who made or sold a type of cloth called say, which was of similar construction to serge.[2] The fifth possibility was a Welsh occupational name for either a carpenter (from the Welsh saer, "carpenter") or a mason (from saer maen, literally "stone-cutter").[2] The sixth possibility is that it derives from a French occupational name for a mower or reaper, from Old French seer, "to cut."[2] The sixth possibility is that it derives from a Dutch occupational name for a person who wove serge, from the Dutch saai, "serge." The final possibility is that it comes from a Dutch occupational name for a sower, from zaaier, "one who sows."[2]

Notes and references