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Patrick Doyle composed the film score for the film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

Career

Patrick Doyle was born on the 6 April, 1953, in Uddingston, Scotland, Great Britain. He studied music at The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama and graduated in 1975. He is a now a Fellow of the RSAMD. In 1987, Patrick joined the Renaissance Theatre Company as composer and musical director, and enjoyed working with some of the finest directors, as Derek Jacobi, Geraldine McEwan and Dame Judi Dench. In 1989 director Kenneth Branagh commissioned him to write the film score for Henry V. The song "Non Nobis Domine", from the film, was awarded the 1989 Ivor Novello Award for Best Film Theme. This led to several more collaborations with Branagh, and Doyle composed the scores for his films, Much Ado About Nothing, Frankenstein, Dead AgainAs You Like It, Love's Labour's Lost, and Thor.

In addition to his work for Branagh, and on Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, he has also composed numerous other film scores, including; Donnie Brasco, Carlito's Way, Eragon, Nim's Island, Calendar Girls, Gosford Park, Nanny McPhee, and Sleuth.

Though a composer by trade, Doyle often makes minor cameo appearances in films which he composes for, including Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, Frankenstein, Dead Again, and As You Like It. He also composed the score for, and voiced a minor character in, the Disney/Pixar film Brave, alongside Kelly Macdonald, Robbie Coltrane, Julie Walters, and Emma Thompson.

His daughter Abigail has been singing professionally since age 11, and performed the song of the Golden egg for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.

In 1997, at age 44, Doyle was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (ACL), a form of blood cancer that kills 85 percent of its sufferers within three years. While he was undergoing chemotherapy, he composed the score for his latest project, Quest For Camelot, and often received hospital visits and care packages from Branagh, Emma Thompson, Alan Rickman, and Timothy Spall, who himself had been diagnosed with the same disease only a few years earlier.[1]

External links

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