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Junior Minister

Should it be created a page for the position of Junior Minister in the Department of Magical Accidents and Catastrophes? It is a high-ranking position within the Department, if I am not mistaken? Ninclow 21:14, March 29, 2015 (UTC)

Junior Minister vs Deputy Head

We know that Cornelius Fudge were the Junior Minister of the Department of Magical Accidents and Catastrophes before being elected Minister for Magic. This makes it sound like that there might be a Minister in the department as well. Is it too far-fetch to assume that as Junior Minister, he was second-in-command in the department, which effectively would make him a Deputy Head?

Is it possible that the position of Junior Minister and Deputy Head in a department is one and the same? If every department has a Junior Minister, which might imply a Minister somewhere as well, then maybe there is a Minister for Magical Law Enforcement which is refered to as the Head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement out of simplicity? 

Hermione Granger were appointed Deputy Head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement. Perhaps the working title of that position is Junior Minister? Ninclow 21:14, March 29, 2015 (UTC)

"We know that Cornelius Fudge were the Junior Minister of the Department of Magical Accidents and Catastrophes before being elected Minister for Magic. This makes it sound like that there might be a Minister in the department as well."
I doubt that there is a Minister of the Department of Magical Accidents and Catastrophes. All the other departments have Heads of Department, and I imagine that it would just be confusing when the highest ranking member of the government is also called Minister.
"Is it too far-fetch to assume that as Junior Minister, he was second-in-command in the department, which effectively would make him a Deputy Head?"
It's possible, but has never been elaborated on.
Is it possible that the position of Junior Minister and Deputy Head in a department is one and the same?"
Departments seem to follow the same structure, and Hermione was Deputy Head of the Department of Law Enforcement, so I think they're distinct positions.
"If every department has a Junior Minister, which might imply a Minister somewhere as well, then maybe there is a Minister for Magical Law Enforcement which is refered to as the Head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement out of simplicity?"
This is a lot of speculation. No, I don't think so.
"Hermione Granger were appointed Deputy Head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement. Perhaps the working title of that position is Junior Minister?"
I think it's very unlikely that that's the case. That's never been implied to be the case. -- Saxon 21:52, March 29, 2015 (UTC)
Simplifying things, a "minister" in the British muggle political system is a politician (generally a Member of Parliament) who is appointed to a supervisory position in a government department (ministry.)  It is important to distinguish the politcians ("ministers") from the civil servants.  A "minister" is usually appointed to a number of different departments as he works up the political ladder and might only spend a year or two in a given ministry before moving up to a higher one in a different ministry.  A civil servant, on the other hand, typically spends her entire career in the civil service in a single department.  The counterpart of a minister in the US government would be a political appointee nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.  Such a person would normally - but not always - have the word "secretary" as part of their title.  For example, "Assistant Secretary of State for Asian Affairs."
To use concrete examples, civil servants would be people like Arthur Weasley and perhaps Delores Umbridge.  (Her title is typically used in the muggle British government to refer to the senior civil servant in the ministry (department.)  Do not confuse the British use of the term "secretary" - in this case "senior undersecretary" for how it is used in the US government.
The key difference is that a "minister" would be one of the top level supervisors in a department who is responsible for setting policy.  Again, this is in contrast to the "civil servants" ("ministry employees") who are responsible for implementing the policy decisions that are made by the ministers. Wva (talk) 00:47, March 30, 2015 (UTC)

Librarian

A page describing Madam Pince's position ought also to be mentioned, in my opinion. Ninclow 21:36, March 29, 2015 (UTC)

I disagree. There's little to nothing to be said about the position. We might as well create pages for "grocer", "barman" and "milkman". -- Saxon 21:56, March 29, 2015 (UTC)

There is a Librarian article already.--Rodolphus (talk) 07:39, March 30, 2015 (UTC)

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